Skip to content

Earnings Call Transcripts now available on Intelligize

July 31, 2017

While no law requires public companies to conduct earnings calls, much less to reveal any particular information in them, the quarterly conference earning call has become a ubiquitous and important feature of the corporate landscape.  The formal record of these calls, the Earnings Call Transcript, has thus becomes an important touchstone to corporate investors and others who need to pay attention to what public companies and markets are doing.

In response to this ever-increasing need, our colleagues at Intelligize recently released a new Earnings Call Transcripts (ECT) application.  Offering full text search and dedicated search filters, the Intelligize ECT solution is the most advanced search tool around, allowing researchers to cut through the clutter gather information more quickly and effectively.

To read more about the ECT application on Intelligize, click here.  To learn more about the history and significance of ECTs, read this recent white paper by Phil Brown, Intelligize Chief Strategy Officer.

 

Trump goes one way, ExxonMobil another

June 2, 2017

Just one day before President Trump’s controversial announcement that the U.S. intended to withdraw from the recently ratified Paris climate accord, shareholders of energy giant ExxonMobil defied the company’s board and voted in favor of a climate change-related resolution.  The nonbinding resolution would require more detailed analysis and disclosure to shareholders regarding the potential impact of policy changes related to climate change, such as those encouraged by the Paris agreement.  “Irrespective of the current administration’s stance on climate change,” one proponent of the resolution argued in a recent press release filed with the SEC, “countries around the world are moving ahead with policies that will limit greenhouse gas emissions and will likely impact the market for ExxonMobil’s products. ExxonMobil puts itself and its long-term investors at risk by failing to acknowledge this reality.”

For more on climate change policies and the Trump administration’s announcement in the context of the business sector, see this post by Marc Butler on our partner Intelligize’s blog.

 

SEC Filings changes are live

April 21, 2017

As we’ve recounted in previous posts, we’ve been working on a number of changes to the Securities Mosaic SEC Filings page in response to customer feedback.  The changes went live earlier this week.  They include:

  • Moving the Filer (Company) search field to the upper left hand corner of the search screen.
  • Restoring the Form Type and Exhibit selection input boxes to the main search form, so that an extra click is no longer necessary to see them.
  • Creating a new “Condensed View” option for our results display that shows more records per screen and is thus more quickly scanned.  (We’ll also give you the option to set the Condensed View as your default display.)
  • Adding hyperlinks to the list of results in our Printable View display,  so that you have an additional way to access an even larger number of search results in a single, condensed view.
  • These adjustments are in addition to a number of smaller changes we made back in January, which included restoring the “Edit Search” button to the results display.

If you have feedback to share or questions to ask regarding our SEC Filings page, please feel free to reach out to me directly at christopher.hitt@lexisnexis.com.

Lexis Securities Mosaic and Intelligize for 10-Q research

April 2, 2017

Securities Mosaic is a great resource for searching on SEC filers’ quarterly reports.  You can filter at the item (section) level of the document to target financial statements, controls and procedures, Management’s Discussion & Analysis, risk factors, and more.  Starting with such an item-level search, you can instantly batch-download or batch-email the full 10-Q including exhibits, or just the specific 10-Q item.  Need to see how a particular company’s MD&A disclosure changed from quarter to quarter, or from original to amended version?  Use the Securities Mosaic redline tool to quickly answer that question.

But what if you need to do even more?  For example, what if you’ve been asked to perform in-depth analysis on what’s being disclosed in today’s 10-Qs, requiring you to delve beyond the item level and isolate particular categories of risk disclosure, MD&A, or notes to financial statements in order to establish “what’s market”?  If that’s your use case, we recommend you also check out our LexisNexis partner Intelligize.  With Intelligize you can track, for example, how common Fair Value Measurements are in the notes to financial statements section of the 10-Q; or how often your peers discuss taxation in their MD&A.

To learn more about how Intelligize can complement and enhance your research on quarterly reports and other SEC filings, click here.

 

Coming Soon: User-requested changes to Securities Mosaic Filings page

March 1, 2017

You spoke.  We listened.

As we detailed in our last blog post, our December release of the redesigned SEC Filings page did not quite meet with the enthusiastic reception we were hoping for.  Even though we packaged the redesign with lots of cool new features — which have indeed been well-received — many users felt we went too far in our efforts to create a clean, uncluttered, and “modern” search page.

We took these complaints seriously.  I personally spoke to many of you, often on multiple occasions, to gather the detailed feedback that would be the foundation for a redesigned redesign.  I’m pleased to announce today that we’ll release the bulk of these customer-prompted changes in a few weeks.

The upcoming changes include:

  • Moving the Filer (Company) search field to the upper left hand corner of the search screen.
  • Restoring the Form Type and Exhibit selection input boxes to the main search form, so that an extra click is no longer necessary to see them.
  • Creating a new “Condensed View” option for our results display that shows more records per screen and is thus more quickly scanned.  (We’ll also give you the option to set the Condensed View as your default display.)
  • Adding hyperlinks to the list of results in our Printable View display,  so that you have an additional way to access an even larger number of search results in a single, condensed view.

These adjustments are in addition to a number of smaller changes we made back in January, which included restoring the “Edit Search” button to the results display.

We’ll let you know when we have a firm release date for these changes, but we expect they’ll go live around the end of this month.

Thanks to everyone who took the time to register feedback and constructive criticism.

Following customer feedback, some adjustments coming to redesigned Filings page on Securities Mosaic

January 17, 2017

Back in early December, when we released our newly enhanced and redesigned SEC Filings page with much fanfare, we were excited about what we saw as the many functional and aesthetic improvements to a search platform that was beginning to seem — to us at least — a little stale after more than a decade of scant change.  Granted, we felt some trepidation about how our loyal customers would respond to a search experience that was, at least at first glance, quite different from what they were accustomed to.  But this trepidation was tempered by many factors: our confidence in our approach to the redesign, which incorporated extensive user feedback and careful thinking through of subtle details; our knowledge that the redesigned page preserved all essential features and functionality—that we had taken nothing away; and our excitement about the many new valuable features that had been added, including a library of predefined searches, the ability to refine results using post-search filters, one-click batch download of results, and more.

Six weeks later, with the benefit of hindsight and much constructive criticism from our customers, we now realize we probably underestimated just how much love you had for the venerable old search page. We also probably underestimated the degree to which folks would be, well, annoyed by having to relearn how to do things — regardless of whether the changes we introduced were in some inherent sense “better.”  And even though we made a concerted effort to alert customers in advance and to offer support and resources for becoming acquainted with the new interface, there’s no doubt that many still felt unprepared for the change.  In short, we regret that the transition to the redesigned Filings page was for many users a little rocky.  And while many of you have told us you’ve gotten used to the new search page – even prefer certain things about it – others miss the old search page, or at least certain aspects of it.

So where does that leave us going forward?  Our primary goal is always to make our customer happy.  But what is the best path to achieving this?  For lots of reasons, we don’t think rolling back the clock and restoring the old search page is the answer. Instead, our plan is to identify the specific elements about the old search form that people miss the most and incorporate them into the new search form.  Based on your feedback, these elements include:

  • Presenting the filing company search box as the first thing you see in the search form
  • Certain important search filters, such as form type and preselected date range (e.g., “Last 3 Years”) selection, being more visible and accessible without an extra click
  • The ability to click an “Edit Search” link to have the option to edit your parameters within the initial search form
  • The ability to see a large number of search results in a single view in order to scan them quickly and without scrolling

You have spoken and we have listened.  We already have changes in development to address these and other items.  Many of these will be released later in January; we expect to have all redesign tweaks complete within the next several months.  Stay tuned to this blog for updates.

In the mean time, if you’d like to offer additional feedback on the redesigned search page, including specific changes you’d like to see, or if to ask me questions or voice any concerns, please feel free to reach out to me directly at christopher.hitt@lexisnexis.com.  Finally, thank you again for your patience and continued dedication to Securities Mosaic.

Corporate and Financial Regulation under a Trump Presidency

December 9, 2016

When Donald Trump takes office on January 20, 2017, a slew of financial regulations passed by the Obama administration will likely be revised or eliminated entirely. Additionally, if Trump utilizes 1996’s obscure Congressional Review Act to strike down a rule, the federal agency that issued that rule is prohibited from enacting a similar rule again in the future. According to an analysis by the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, over 150 rules adopted since late May 2016 are theoretically susceptible to the ax.

The fact that Trump is consulting with Paul Atkins, who served as a Republican member of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) from 2002 to 2008, is reflective of how the president-elect will target certain regulations, as Atkins during his tenure spoke out against big fines for companies and frequently found fault with Dodd-Frank. Additionally, Mary Jo White’s November 14 announcement that she will step down as head of the SEC before Trump takes office and two years before the end of her term leaves vulnerable some of the most significant initiatives in the past few years and clears the way for Trump to reshape the way in which Wall Street is regulated.

Below is a summary of some of the regulations that are said to be susceptible to change:White House Snow Panorama

Volcker Rule: Instead of completely repealing Dodd-Frank, the Trump administration and Congress would presumably target the portions of the law that aggravate the banks the most, including the Volcker Rule, which forbids banks from making risky bets with their own money.

CFPB: Trump could consider restricting the authority of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), the watchdog agency that has pursued harsher rules governing debt collection, payday loans and overdraft fees and has also proposed banning mandatory arbitration clauses that limit class-action lawsuits from consumers. The CFPB recently scored a major victory when it fined Wells Fargo $100 million for allegedly opening fake accounts for its customers. Republicans have regularly criticized the CFPB, arguing that the financial services industry is already severely regulated.

Fiduciary Rule: Trump has vowed to stop or dismantle the Labor Department’s fiduciary rule, which aims to remove conflicts and guarantee that brokers put the interests of retirement savers first and is set to take effect in April 2017.

Disclosure of Executive Pay: Shortly after Trump takes the oath of office, he is expected to repeal the SEC’s pay disclosure rule, which requires companies to disclose pay ratios between their CEOs and employees.

Conflict Minerals Rule: Also on the chopping block could be the rule that would require companies to disclose whether their products contain conflict minerals, namely those that were mined in a war-torn region of Africa.

PCAOB: Republicans have recently criticized the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”), which was created to oversee and draft new rules for corporate auditors. At issue with Republicans are the agency’s proposal that companies rotate auditors to reduce conflicts, as well as the agency’s requirement that accounting firms disclose the name of individual partners who are working on company audits.

According to DealBook, the Trump administration will likely first focus on more politically charged issues such as the Affordable Care Act, immigration, environmental regulations, and the Supreme Court. As a result, the financial industry will likely dwell in uncertainty for several more years.